Native Farm Bill Coalition

The Farm Bill is one of the single largest pieces of domestic legislation in the United States. Enacted by Congress approximately every five years, it addresses everything from nutrition programs to agricultural policies, food production to rural development.

Indian Country has enormous interest in this legislation, yet in previous Farm Bills, Native nations and producers have struggled to get Congress to act on their needs.

 

This is why the Native Farm Bill Coalition was formed – to give Native Americans a strong, united voice to advance a common Farm Bill agenda. It is a joint project of the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community’s Seeds of Native Health campaign to improve Native dietary health and food access; the Intertribal Agriculture Council; the National Congress of American Indians; and the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative.

 

Accomplishments

More than 170 tribes, intertribal groups, other Native organizations and non-Native allies have become members of the Coalition. The members helped develop the Coalition’s priorities for the Farm Bill, which kept Congress focused on tribal concerns, ultimately leading to great successes.

 Thanks to the Coalition’s research, education and advocacy at the U.S. Capitol and across the country, the 2018 Farm Bill was signed into law in December 2018 with 63 separate provisions that benefit Indian Country, something never accomplished before.

These 63 provisions impact everything from supporting tribal self-governance and management of nutrition programs to investing in economic development opportunities. Click here to read a summary of these tribal provisions.

Following the Farm Bill signed, the Coalition remained active to advocate for Indian Country as the new tribal authorities and access passed in the Farm Bill are implemented.

The Native Farm Bill Coalition is a groundbreaking umbrella organization, formed to advocate for Native American interests in the 2018 Farm Bill.

The Native Farm Bill Coalition is a groundbreaking umbrella organization, formed to advocate for Native American interests in the 2018 Farm Bill.

Indian Country faces some of the worst health disparities of any population group in the nation, and Native communities have the highest rate of reliance on federal feeding programs. Native producers, who represent the key to tribal food sovereignty and self-reliance, face major regulatory and financial obstacles. It is crucial for all of Indian Country and its allies to be at the table to help shape future legislation – tribes, intertribal groups, Native organizations serving urban and rural populations alike, and others.